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Le grand frisson

1

Quatre saisons en Islande

When you live in a city, you can lose all notion of the seasons: spring may be too subtle or autumn evanescent. This would be unheard of in Iceland, as portrayed in photos and words by journalist Olivier Joly. Frozen in winter monochrome, the sky streaked with the northern lights, the island unfolds into the vibrant hues of summer, the midnight sun, the torrential waters after the thaw. Then comes autumn, the lava fi elds, the russet-colored heath. When the polar winds have locked down the highlands, it will be time to reopen this book.

Par Olivier Joly

Éditions Favre
2

Chalet in the Sky

In the 30th century, people fly also with their homes. As Europe is being rebuilt after an environmental catastrophe, an uncle and his two nephews set off on a trip around the world aboard the Villa Beauséjour. In this illustrated tale written in 1925, draftsman and journalist Albert Robida settles some scores with the West while advocating the best use of resources. Visionary?

Par Albert Robida

BnF Éditions
3

L’Ascension de Saussure

There was a time when mountain climbing was neither a sport nor even an idea. This was before Horace Bénédict de Saussure scaled Mont Blanc on August 3, 1787. Pierre Zenzius recounts this expedition: in a magnifi cent landscape, wearing a powdered wig and a long vermilion jacket, the Swiss naturalist and geologist set off to tackle the ascension of his dreams, assisted by a cheerful but undisciplined team. Comical and poetic.

Par Pierre Zenzius

Le Rouergue
4

Sweet

One of the nicest ways of kicking back in January is to spend afternoons baking sweet things. With Yotam Ottolenghi, the virtuoso of vegetarian dishes, cakes, cookies and candies feature a variety of Middle Eastern accents. Everything is intuitive yet meticulously thought out. The taste buds discover new horizons while keeping their bearings: sweet heaven.

Par Yotam Ottolenghi et Helen Goh

Hachette Cuisine
5

When Granddad Was a Penguin

What could be weirder than a grandpa who’s lost his bearings? There he is sleeping in the freezer, sliding down the stairs, talking about fishing and gulping down fish after fish. But a closer look reveals that this strange grandfather is completely different. As in a kind of polar micro-theater, a trip to the zoo has resulted in a mischievous switching of roles. Grandpa thought he was a penguin, but nobody had noticed! Fortunately, this wacky grown-up has a perceptive granddaughter, ready to straighten things out.

Par Morag Hood

P’tit Glénat
Paul Smith, velo, Mode

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Looking up !
by Paul Smith